Updated: ITIL Foundation Certificates Since 1994

Using Exin data provided by Aale Roos (Twitter), I am able to estimate the number of ITIL Foundation certificates issued from 1994 to 2011. I now estimate 1,253,100 ITIL Foundation certificates have been issued since 1994, including ITIL v2, ITIL v3, and ITIL v3 Bridge, up 21% from 2010.

I estimate another 250,600 Foundation certificates will be issued in 2012.

Please click on the thumbnail for a larger version.

ITIL Exam 2011 Statistics

Overview

APM Group just released their final exam performance statistics for all of 2011. ITSMinfo blog is now presenting our unadulterated free analysis of SPAM marketing registration.

Note: Click on any image for a larger version. All numbers rounded to 100’s place unless otherwise obvious.

ITIL Foundation

The total number of ITIL V3 Foundation and V3 Foundation Bridge exams taken was 250,400 in 2011, a growth rate of 8% over 2010.

A total of 220,200 ITIL V3 Foundation and V3 Bridge Foundation certificates were issued in 2011, compared to 185,800 in 2010, a growth rate of 19%. The average pass rate was 88%, compared to 85% in 2010.

I estimate 827,100 ITIL V2, ITIL V3, and ITIL V3 Bridge Foundation certificates were issued since 2008.

ITIL Advanced Certifications

A total 27,500 Lifecycle exams were attempted in 2011, up 83% from 2010.A total of 21,300 Lifecycle certificates were issued in 2011, up 95% from 2010. The average passrate was 76% across all exams.

A total 17,000 Capability exams were attempted in 2011, up 55% from 2010. There were 13,700 Capability certificates issued in 2011, up 60% from 2010. The average passrate was 79% across all exams.

Managing Across the Lifecycle (MALC): 4,000 exams were attempted in 2011, up 128% from 2010. About 2,600 ITIL V3 Expert certificates were issued in 2011 based on the MALC exam, up 149% from 2010. The average passrate was 62%.

Of the ITIL V3 Expert certificates issued, 5,000 were achieved via the Managers Bridge, including 2,000 in June 2011, which was the last month the Managers Bridge was offered (thereafter only retakes were allowed).

The total number of ITIL V3 Experts minted was 7,600, up 88% from 2010. Approximately 16,200 Expert certificates have been issued since 2008.

Regional Variations

Foundation

Intermediate

The Problem of CSFs

If you are unable or unwilling to appoint a Problem Manager, you are not ready for Problem Management.

That’s what I said. Or at least I think that’s what I said.

The venerable and ubiquitous Chris Dancy quoted me this January 2011 on episode 1 of the re-formed Pink Elephant Practitioner Radio podcast. He quoted me as saying “you can’t do Problem Management without a Problem Manager”. I finally listened to it last Friday.

I want to apologize to Chris. First, I apologize that I didn’t listen to his podcast earlier. I am a couple months behind on my podcast queue. Second, I apologize that I didn’t thank him personally at #PINK11 in February for the mention. I love Chris in almost every conceivable way.

I don’t fully agree with the paraphrase. I think a company can successfully implement a Problem Management process without a Problem Manager. What I really wanted to say was this: If you are unable or unwilling to appoint a Problem Manager, you probably haven’t achieved all the critical success factors you need to successfully carry out Problem Management. Unfortunately, this sentence doesn’t tweet well, so I abbreviated.

ITIL v3 Service Operations lists the critical success factors for Service Operations processes:

  1. Management Support
  2. Business Support
  3. Champions
  4. Staffing and retention
  5. Service Management training
  6. Suitable tools
  7. Validity of testing
  8. Measurement and reporting

All of these are necessary to successfully implement Problem Management. Organizations that lack any of these factors won’t appoint a Problem Manager. My advice to organizations, then, is very simple: appoint a Problem Manager. If they cannot do this, they are not ready for Problem Management.

In fairness, a few organizations do meet all the above CSF’s and choose to implement Problem Management without a centralized point of contact. It is the responsibility of managers to perform Problem Management activities inside their own group. Organizations with the right culture can get away with this. Most organizations cannot.

For that matter, most organizations cannot muster the courage or resources to appoint a Problem Manager.