The Role of COBIT5 in IT Service Management

In Improvement in COBIT5 I discussed my preference for the Continual Improvement life cycle.

Recently I was fact-checking a post on ITIL (priorities in Incident Management) and I became curious about the guidance in COBIT5.

The relevant location is “DSS02.02 Record, classify and prioritize requests and incidents” in “DSS02 Manage Service Requests and Incidents”. Here is what is says:

3. Prioritise service requests and incidents based on SLA service definition of business impact and urgency.

Yes, that’s all it says. Clearly COBIT5 has some room for improvement.

COBIT5 is an excellent resource that compliments several frameworks, including ITIL, without being able to replace them. For the record, the COBIT5 framework says it serves as a “reference and framework to integrate multiple frameworks,” including ITIL. COBIT5 never claims it replaces other frameworks.

We shouldn’t expect to throw away ITIL books for a while. Damn! I was hoping to clear up some shelf space.

Improvement in COBIT 5

In a previous post I discussed starting your service or process improvements efforts with Continual Service Improvement (or just Improvement).

I prefer COBIT5, and the issue is ITIL. The good news is the Continual Service Improvement is the shortest of the five core books of ITIL 2011. CSI defines a 7 Step Improvement Process:

  1. Identify the strategy for improvement
  2. Define what you will measure
  3. Gather the data
  4. Process the data
  5. Analyze the information and data
  6. Present and use the information
  7. Implement improvement

This method, as the name suggests, is heavily focused on service and process improvement. It is infeasible in situations where there is no discernible process, a complete absence of metrics, and a lack of activity that could be captured for measurement and analysis. It is infeasible in most services and processes described in most organizations, due to this lack of maturity.

I find the COBIT5 method is more flexible. It also provides 7 steps, but it also views them from multiple standpoints, such as program management, change enablement, and the continuous improvement life cycle.

For example, the program management view consists of:

  1. Initiate program
  2. Define problems and opportunities
  3. Define road map
  4. Plan program
  5. Execute plan
  6. Realize benefits
  7. Review effectiveness

COBIT5 provides a framework that is more flexible and yet more concise, but still provides detailed guidance on implementation and improvement efforts in terms of a) roles and responsibilities, b) tasks, c) inputs and d) outputs among others.

Therefore I find the COBIT5 framework, particularly the COBIT5 Implementation guide, superior to the Continual Service Improvement book of ITIL 2011.

In addition COBIT5 provides a goals cascade that provides detailed guidance and mapping between organizational and IT-related goals and processes throughout the framework that may influence those goals. The goals cascade is useful guidance for improvement efforts, but alas it is the subject of another discussion.