Should Backups be Tracked as CIs?

Short answer: probably not.

Is there any business value in tracking backups? In other words, can you improve operational efficiency, increase revenue or defer costs in excess of expenses by doing so?

One scenario to track backups as CIs would occur if the cost of loss (I.e to reputation) is significantly in excess of tracking costs, and the status of the CIs can be updated throughout their life cycle. This is especially true if tracking can be automated.

I am not aware of any companies doing this. In most cases a process or operating manual provides sufficient control of backups.

2 thoughts on “Should Backups be Tracked as CIs?”

  1. Its a really good conversation and the comments made by Gregory are so true. I think its more a case of a backup or dependency on a backup service is the key. Knowing that a) you are using or have a back up service and b) that your service or CI is impacted when there is an issue with the Backup Service you depend on, then you would want to know about that. The actual detail of the backup, success rates, available restores etc would typically be stored in another management toolset, but is reference-able in some way to the CI’s that it is delivering or providing the backup service for.

  2. I agree entirely with your comments, Chris. The components that contribute to or provide your backup services are candidates, as are any involved in BCP/DR, Availability Management, etc.

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