Definitive Process Library? Huh?

This morning one of North America’s leaders in IT best practice consulting, PLEXENT, surprised me with a headline: IT Improvement: What is a Definitive Process Library (DPL)?

Besides a marketing term they made up, it made me wonder, what exactly is a Definitive Process Library?

My conclusion after research: it is a marketing term they made up.

ITIL does not define a DPL. ITIL does define a Definitive Media Library (DML) in Service Transition (Release and Deployment Management):

One or more locations in which the definitive and authorized versions of all software CIs are securely stored. The DML may also contain associated CIs such as licenses and documentation. It is a single logical storage area even if there are multiple locations. The DML is controlled by Service Asset and Configuration Management and is recorded in the Configuration Management System (CMS).

Replace “software” with “processes” and you almost have a definition of DPL, if you would choose to do so (for reasons other than marketing and self-promotion). But why would you?

An organization oriented around services supported by processes would be deeply affected by at all levels, including:

  • The organizational chart
  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Approval matrices
  • Authorization rights
  • Communication plans
  • Key Performance Indicators and reporting metrics
  • Human capital management
  • Automation tools

To name just a few. ITIL provides a conceptual framework dealing with these challenges, including the CMDB, the CMS, and the SKMS.

For services ITIL has added the Service Portfolio and the Service Catalog, concepts which for knowledge management purposes could be dealt with through the broader framework of Knowledge Management.

For processes, they are stored in the CMDB and managed through Change Management. No other consideration is required, besides how you publish, communicate and manage the downstream impacts (some of which are mentioned above).

In practice I have not observed any outstanding or notable best practices. I have seen them stored and published on a file share, on SharePoint, on the Intranet in a CMDB, and as email attachments. Have you seen best practices that uniquely stand out? If so let me know, I would love to hear it.